Skip to main content

About your Search

20121222
20121230
STATION
CSPAN 11
CNBC 9
CSPAN2 3
KQED (PBS) 2
KRCB (PBS) 2
MSNBCW 2
FBC 1
KPIX (CBS) 1
KQEH (PBS) 1
KTVU (FOX) 1
WETA 1
WJZ (CBS) 1
WUSA (CBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 39
Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)
south asia correspondent julie mccarthy, who's reporting this story from delhi. jns julie, there are tens of thousands of rapes in end yabs, there are 40,000 rape cases currently-- currently in the courts. why has this case caught the national imagination? >> wbltion i think what cause the imagination of the people was this horrendous attack on this young woman that is 23-year-old girl who was-- who is at the heart of this upheaval in india. after the shock subsided there was anger and it poured out into the streets. so you had a very graphic symbol around which people rallied. and the protests in many ways were spontaneous. they were driven by the it revolution that is india. social media played a huge role in assembling people, getting out the message, what were they doing, where were they doing it. and prot testers were demanding sus 'tis for this young woman who they said was gang raped on a moving bus that passed through police check pointses that assault was taking place. so there was dismay of the police who had long been criticized on their infectioniveness on hand
south asia correspondent julie mccarthy, who's reporting this story from delhi. jns julie there are tens of thousands of rapes in end yabs, there are 40,000 rape cases currently-- currently in the courts. why has this case caught the national imagination? >> wbltion i think what cause the imagination of the people was this horrendous attack on this young woman that is 23-year-old girl who was-- who is at the heart of this upheaval in india. after the shock subsided there was anger and it poured out into the streets. so you had a very graphic symbol around which people rallied. and the protests in many ways were spontaneous. they were driven by the it revolution that is india. social media played a huge role in assembling people, getting out the message, what were they doing, where were they doing it. and prot testers were demanding sus 'tis for this young woman who they said was gang raped on a moving bus that passed through police check pointses that assault was taking place. so there was dismay of the police who had long been criticized on their infectioniveness on handling violent cri
in july, early july, and today we're up 3.7% at 1928. however, look at a one--year chart of the dow comparing it to the vix. what often happens is when the vix peaks as it did in june and july, that can mark a bottom in the stock market so we're starting to move up again. i'm just saying. not trying to forecast anything and here's what happened today at the dow, sort of falling off here in the latter part of the hour but not off. off the lows of the day. down 21 points. material stocks were the strength today. up 1.5%. everybody else was either unchanged or lower. what do you make of the increased volatility or increased fear here, david darst, as we go into the end of the year? >> one of the best charts is the vix being high. it was a time to buy. in chicago that's a famous saying. when the vix is high it's time to buy. >> we high enough yet? >> not yet, not yet. got the fiscal cliff issues which you've talked about a lot here. >> yes, we have. >> jobs coming out on friday. morgan stanley looking for 185,000. basically the housing market, you had the case schiller numbers today. it
with those marines. he took leave the first of july and secretly married theresa. july 10 was the last time i saw him. he arrived in afghanistan the end of july and wrote these final words in his journal on august 2. mom, dad, i can never repay you for all you have done for me. you made me into the man i am today. i hope that i have made you proud. that has always been my goal. i love you both so much. tell the girls i love them and couldn't be prouder older brother. i have always tried to be an honorable man and i truly believe in what we are doing here. i am doing this for my family so that they need not fear. my country so that can be a beacon of light for the entire world. the men around me because no one could ask for it better company than the u.s. armed forces and finally, i do this for myself so that i might know the measure of myself and in and not be found wanting. i believe that it is my duty to fight and having done all that i can to simply stand against this and all the evil work that is upon this earth. he called me on the fifth and said, the people are so nice and the kids are
on july the 25th the democratic bill is, quote, a revenue measure that didn't originate in the house so it's got no chance whatsoever of becoming law, end quote. that's what i said back on july 25th. the only reason we ever allowed that vote on that proposal, as i said at that time, was that we knew it didn't pass constitutional muster and that democrats were really serious they would proceed to a revenue bill that originated in the house, as the constitution requires, and as i called on them to do again last week. to repeat, the so-called senate bill is nothing more than a glorified sense of the senate resolution so let's put that convenient talking point aside from here on out. last night i told the president we'd be happy to look at whatever he proposes, but the truth is we're coming up against a hard deadline here, and as i said this is a conversation we should have had months ago. and republicans aren't about to write a blank check for anything senate democrats put forward just because we find ourselves at the edge of the cliff. that wouldn't be fair to the american people. that havin
to a second look. i'm julie haener. tonight far from home at the holidays. this is a tough time of year for military personnel serving overseas and their families here at home. but sometimes it's also the season for homecoming. elizabeth pran first brought us this story on christmas eve last year. >> daddy, daddy. >> reporter: an emotional reunion at naval air station woube island in washington state. >> i love you. >> reporter: the final men and lady of the yellow jacket squadron returned to their families home for good from iraq. >> just in time for christmas. >> we worked hard to make sure that happened and we're here. it's a good day i think for everybody. >> reporter: just last week a caravan of u.s. soldiers and supplies crossing the border from iraq into kuwait marking the last american combat troops to leave after almost nine years of fighting. now at fort hood texas, tears and relief as these nearly 200 soldiers marched toward their families. they are among the very last u.s. combat soldiers to leave the country and return home. >> it feels great. i'm real happy. it's been almo
're in for any kind of calamity. >> 20.3. >> that was in july. look at the february and april. they're actually -- well, april is just about even where we are now. february certainly doesn't suggest any kind of a plunge. >> no, doesn't portend any kind of craziness. thank you, mary. >> tyler. michelle, thank you. with senate majority leader harry reid warning we are going over the fiscal cliff, let's pose the question is it better if that were to happen. are automatic spending cuts perhaps what the country needs? josh bulk is a national correspondent with the fiscal times. josh, good to have you back. good to see you. >> good to see you. >> it's not all that bad if we go over the cliff. is there a good, compelling argument to make for doing so? >> there are compelling arguments to make for going over the cliff. it might create pressure for a genuine and real deal, not just with tax reform but spending cuts, but there's a lot of dangers in doing it. one of the big things that's screaming on my radar is the alternative minimum tax. that's a tax that is meant to prevent the wealthiest from escapin
that it did. i was not on that trip, so i do not know specifically. i also visited libya in july. i also visited in september after the attack in benghazi. i can speak to my own experience. secretary clinton has said, all those of us as senior leaders are responsible for what is happening. i certainly hold myself accountable. i certainly had a lot of time to think about sharper questions i could have cost, sharper focus i could have provided. >> on your visit in july,, or september, the debt issue and specific come up? the folks on the ground say, we're worried about what has happened was security? >> no, there's no specific discussion about it. i did talk to ambassador stevens in general terms. in march of 2012? >> i am certain it did. we certainly emphasize the importance of not only improve in the security capabilities of the libyan interim government at that time. we offered a number of programs to help them build those institutions which are made one of the greatest weaknesses of the libyan it from government. -- interim government. >> your pretty sure that the issue came up, you ju
decided to adopt from russia. it took nearly 18 months, but last july, the couple was matched with a 15-month-old boy. enen you saw his picture for the first time, what did you think? k i knew that this was the child i was meant to parent. and i took one look at this little ginger boy, and i fell in love with him. >> reporter: the summers began filling their new jersey home with baby clothes, a crib, and even a stroller. they traveled to his orphanage in russia twice to bond with him. >> say, hi, daddy. >> reporter: you've given him a name. >> yes. preston mackey summers. he's a wonderful young boy who needs love and attention. >> reporter: like 1,500 other american families, the summers torry that the law banning opericans from adopting russian thedren could prevent them from bringing a child home. the law is widely seen as retaliation for a new american law banning russians accused of human rights violations from entering the united states. ctimsummers are hoping politics pn't stop them from becoming parents. on your last trip there, that was the last thing you said to him? m> i said
was to pass every appropriations bill by the fourth of july break. my staff said i am crazy. it was feasible if you went about the work seriously. by the fourth of the library, guess what? all of the bills had been passed. we were able to send everyone of those bills to the president's desk. they were signed in the law with bipartisan support. that sort of work can make a difference. more voices need to be heard in support of that effort. >> my recollection would be since then, it has been budgeting by continuing resolutions. >> we have done an awful lot. a lot of people do not realize we have demonstrated we can do this regular order. the more we move the committee back rather than having everything dominated in a speaker's office, the better off the congress will be. >> who loses and who gains when -- >> the existing agencies have their pipelines already clogged with money and we throw more money at it without any serious oversight. continuing resolutions are ignoring our responsibility and our goal is that we have got a job to do. it is time we get back to the responsibility. the sooner w
experience. i've also visited libya -- >> in july? >> i visited in july but i also visited in september after the attack on benghazi. so i can speak to my own experience. you know, went secretary clinton said all of his senior leaders in the department are accountable and responsible for what happened at it certainly felt myself. ihop the remains of my former colleagues back after the attack in benghazi. had been in the middle east on a trip and cut short to come back with them. and all that long flight home i certainly have a lot of time to think about sharper questions that i could've asked, sharper focus that i could have provided. spent on your visit in july or september, did you -- >> july, yes. >> did that issue come up? did the folks on the ground say to you we are really worried about what's happening here with security? we've made a number of requests? >> there was no specific question about that. i did talk to ambassador stevens about the security situation but we didn't talk about specifics at the time. >> secretary clinton met with the prime minister in march with -- you know if t
the in"under god" were added to the pledge of allegiance, it he proclaimed the fourth of july and national day of prayer. on that day, eisenhower fished in the morning, both in the afternoon, and played bridge in the evening. there were prayers -- perhaps when the chief executive faced a daunting putt. this was not his first foray into the darkened ground of the relationship between religion and american politics. three days before christmas in 1952, president elect ike made a speech in which she said "our form of government has no sense unless it is founded in the deeply felt religious faith and i do not care what it is." he received a much ridicule from his cultured despise years. his professed indifference to the major of the religious faith. it is the first part of the statement that deserves continuing attention. certainly many americans, perhaps the majority of them, agreed that democracy or at least our democracy, which is based on a belief in natural rights, presupposes religious faith. people believe this that all people are endowed by their creator with certain unali
, on the floor we call it the growth dividend. if you look at a chart for our ten-year starting on july 26th, and i pick july 26th because that was mario draghi's big day. he said anything it takes. as you look at our rates over that period, then look at the boon rates over that period. you can see that the growth/disparity, our yields are higher in that formation than boon yields, because even though funding issues have been largely contained since that july 26th day, we can still see that the prospects for growth may be reflected in these charts, as the prospects for growth are larger in the u.s., fiscal cliffs issues would make it larger. foreign exchange, mainly everybody on this post-holiday, light volume session, seems to have one eye on the yen. whether it's against the u.s. currency, the dollar/yen or euro/yen. both patterns look more aggressive on the dollar side. obviously abe as prime minister is going to bring along with him the largest printing press we can remember recently. and that, of course, will start a chain reaction and maybe other printing presses will run a little fast
not remember them in any of the pictures. it was julie, david, and my parents walking them out. my dad came into the oval office with they had moved us children. you could just see this sadness. it was almost as if you had been to a funeral and there was a death. you did not know what to say. it was a very awkward moment of what do you say. we came together as a family knowing we were headed up to the east room where he would be sworn in, which of course was a very joyous moment to see your father, but what a sad moment for the american people. >> the question that i think probably everyone secretly asks themselves when they meet you is what is it like to grow up in the white house? a kid's perspective on a day-to- day living standpoint. what are your rooms like? >> first thing is it became my room. i wanted to know who else had been in my room. [laughter] so i asked the curator. he said, well, i can't think of anybody famous. [laughter] and so, then, i asked president eisenhower. who slept in this room when you were here? he said i think queen elisabeth lady in waiting was there. [laughter
talked about this is a couple of years ago when we hit hit it in july and i was dead wrong. i was entirely dead wrong. i thought congress would make sure we wouldn't lose our aaa debt rate. >> and we did. >> and -- yeah. i figured certainly logically that yields would go up on bonds. and that the stock market would fall and just the opposite happening. what happen this time to the markets still have patience. you know, rinehart talk about that bang moment when countries are able to continue to issue really cheap debt for a long, long time. sounding like forever and boom. it stops. i don't think that will be this moment. but sooner or later, the world's financing capability and -- intentions and -- stop. >> what do you do right now? i think a lot of people who were watching don't understand necessarily what impact hitting the debt ceiling would necessarily mean to them or to the nation's finance. personally, i think there is a lot of pier mongering in washington and i don't think it is necessarily that big of a deal. what do you do with your finances right here? what are you in
. >> sitting at 21.29. >> a level we haven't seen since july when the market peaked so a few more people are throwing in the towel as we go into the weekend. >> a pity. so much focus on what people call it noise or headlines, whatever we want to say. we did get positive economic data today, didn't we, in the form of housing data and home sales data and the chick pmi and that's pretty much being ignored and everyone is focusing on what headlines come out of washington. we'll be back with the closing countdown. >> and i'll talk to one trader who has been one of the most positive on the floor expecting a resolution. we'll get his take now. also, after the bell health care stocks have had a pretty good year but what happens under obama care next yore? how to play that sector still ahead. you're washing cnbc, first in business worldwide. they have carb steady, with carbs that digest slowly to help minimize blood sugar spikes. [ male announcer ] glucerna hunger smart. a smart way to help manage hunger and diabetes. [ male announcer ] glucerna hunger smart. to the best vacation sp(all) the gulf
for the first time since july. which would mean that the market was actually getting sweaty palms here, don't you think? >> yeah. it's getting pretty chaotic. the interesting thing to me is you look at the volume. the volume is extremely low. look at a stock like apple. shares 20 million shares in a day. today half the volume. traded 10 million shares. came out and said the house would meet on sunday. the market rallied to the upside this. reminds me of a different scenario. not going to use the dishwasher one. it will remind me of greece. greece is getting bailed out. and going on back and forth. will there be a deal by december 31st? i don't think so, but if a deal gets penned out by mid-january, we can look forward to focusing on earnings and get this fiscal cliff over with so we can see what's going on important in the world, and that's earnings. >> let me -- can i comment on that? >> yeah, sure. >> i want to comment on rick santelli's optimistic view that maybe there really is a deal in the offing. he has a point, you know. it's not over, you know, until it's over and these guys do som
're celebrating? i don't think it's easter or july 4 and we haven't quite gotten to new year's day yet. i believe the holiday we're celebrating is christmas. and we should call it a christmas tree. and they kind of set it o rest that they don't really use that word here, that they're more inclusive than calling a christmas tree a christmas tree. >> rick: you bring up a good point. when you and i were kids, it was very common, everybody said merry christmas to everyone at that time. and i grew up in a predominantly christian town. when i moved away into a larger city and eventually had some jewish friends in a town that didn't have a big jewish population, i suddenly became away there was hanukkah. we said things happy holidays to have an idea of inclusivity. but this has gone so far the other way. how do you think that transition happened? >> well, i think we've become so politically correct, frankly speaking, that really our brains have fallen out. it is okay to say merry christmas. it is okay to say happy hanukkah. the supreme court has already weighed in on these issues and two landmark cases,
.l >> it is a great resource for anyone to know the ins and outs of capitol hill. >> julie watches c-span on verizon. brought to you as a public service by your television provider. >> dan burton is retiring from congress. he talked with c-span about his past investigations of the clinton investigation and the oversight role of congress. this is 30 minutes. >> how would you say the state is? >> it has changed a great deal. it is not the same as when i came 1983. there seemed to be more comedy. tip o'neill was speaker. i will never forget he was the first time he was on the floor raising cane with democrats. and he came down and started giving me the dickens. after that we became very good friends and played golf together. bob michael was a wonderful leader. there was a spirit of camaraderie even though we had differences politically then that we do not have now. now it is much more combative. i have a lot of friends on the democratic side of the aisle, very good friends. as far as working things out is not as easy as it used to be. >> what are some of the root causes? >> i think and i am not pointin
rockets on july 4 or maybe setting up another nuclear test around new year's. you know, we go through these cycles. we assume that one day we are going to get them back to the negotiating table, we try to do that, and then they turn around and they break their promise. we are right back where we started from. my point is that i think we should really stop thinking about what we can do to handle this situation. rather, we should accept that the north koreans control the table on this. heather: so do nothing? >> well, what can we do? the chinese and russians don't help us on sanctions. they have been ineffective because china that dan. you know, when you look at it, everything that we have tried after the bush years has been a failure. now, during the bush years in the early part of that administration, it puts real financial squeeze on the regime. but then they drop it because they have this fantasy that if we can just sit down one more time with the north koreans, suddenly we will have a deal that will make all this go away. it is not how the world works. the north koreans are getting
they are going after hagel partly because of this moment on the floor in july of 2006. this was during israel and lebanon's war and this is chuck hagel pushing the u.s. to urge a cease-fire. take a look. >> how do we realistically believe that a continuation of this system attic destruction of an american friend, the country and the people of lebanon is going to enhance america's image and give us the trust and sustainability to maintain a peace effort in the middle east? the sickening slaughter on both sides, mr. president, must end and it must end now. >> president bush must call for an immediate cease-fire. this madness must stop. the united states will remain committed to defending israel. a relationship has been in israel is a special and historic one, but it need not and cannot be at the expense of our arab and muslim relationships. that is an irresponsible and dangerous false choice. >> what's so striking about that is that that war between israel and lebanon, which the american political establishment essentially supported unanimously as it wants to do in these sort of conflicts, was
legislation passed back in july, which would extend the bush tax cuts for everyone making under $250,000 a year. that that would be a vehicle for trying to get all of this done. there are a lot of other things out there like that expiring payroll tax cut. it looks like that will not get renewed. a whole pile of things. lori: a pile of what? [ laughter ] i could not resist. it is the day after christmas. >> happy new year's. tracy: it surely wasn't a holly jolly christmas for netflix users. 27 million without streaming service. shibani joshi here with the details. shibani: 27 of its 30 million customers did not have service on a knife that is very important for people. they want to watch a movie and not watch a christmas story for the 100th time. there was a blackout on amazon service. they were blocking people from getting access to movies and television shows. it was through numerous devices. there was just no way to get the context. you have to watch television or talk to your family. [talking over each other] shibani: we are finding out whose problem it really is. a lot of finger-
rank in the foreign service career ambassador and became deputy secretary of state in july of 2011. she is only the second serving career diplomat in history to become deputy secretary and ambassador burns served from 2008 to 2011 as undersecretary for political affairs as assistant secretary of state for near eastern affairs from 01 to 05 and and esther jordan from 08 to 2001. ambassador burns served in a number of other posts in the foreign service in '82 and putting the executive secretary of the state department and a special assistant secretary to christopher albright and acting director of principal deputy director of the state department policy planning staff. ambassador burns is the recipient of the two presidential distinguished service awards and a member of department of state awards and all well learned. thank you. thomas nides is the deputy secretary of state for management and resources serving as the chief operating officer of the department. prior to joining the administration, mr. nides was the chief operating officer of morgan stanley from 2005 to 2010 before joining m
for liberation who elected a pro-american government in july, who sought greater u.s. assistance to treat their wounded, train their national security forces come to secure their borders, build their democratic institutions, and expand the rule of law. libyans did not want al qaeda militias running amok in large parts of the country. that is the reality we now face. this is the broader failure of the administration's so-called life footprint approach toward libya. regardless of whom the president nominates to serve in his cabinet, we will continue to ask these questions and demand answers and accountability. i would like to concur with senator mccain. i thought the report was very detailed and the recommendations good and solid in terms of how to better understand the intelligence and run it, how to improve security on the ground, and there is much we can learn from this report. here is what we do know -- we know nothing about president obama before, during, and after the attack. they're making two movies about his use of in the bin laden rate, and he deserves that. it was well executed a
this, it was not a last-minute thing. we passed this out in july of the senate judiciary committee. we did it quickly so that we would not be in this last-minute matter. this has no operational impact on the intelligence community, but it does ensure the strongest of oversight. i hope that -- i hope senators will support it and i yield the floor. mrs. feinstein: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from california. mrs. feinstein: i rise to oppose this amendment and indicate the administration opposes the amendment. we have just four days to reauthorize this critical intelligence tool before it expires. that's the reason for having the house bill before us today. the house bill is a clean bill. it extends the program to 2017, when it would sunset and be -- and would meet another -- need another reauthorization. i believe we must pass this bill now. i believe that 2017 is the appropriate date. it gets the job done. i'm very worried if we do anything else, if we pass any one of these amendments, we will jeopardize the continuation of what is a vital intelligence tool. so reg
that this past july. beautiful experience. >> juliet: and what is your next climb going to be, young man? >> the next climb is january 12 to the 17. we're going up to mount washington to do ice climbing. >> kelly: oh, wow. >> juliet: i have to ask you, we sit here and we complain over our lives sometimes when we have everything and we are able-bodies, we've got our legs. what is it about you that makes you able to be so strong and have such a -- so brave and so positive? >> you know, i believe that i could have handled the situation either way. i could be absolutely miserable or i could be positive and try to help. just like i said before, i was given that second chance and it's kept me positive and all i want to do is be able to help out these families. >> kelly: keith, god bless you and thank you for your service to this country. >> juliet: yes, thank you. >> kelly: you make us all very proud and to donate no the special warriors foundation, go to what we're going to show you righto to our web site. you are a remarkable man. god bless you. >> juliet: let us know how it all goes. >> abs
back in 08 and was working in july, i think, he suffered cardiac arrhythmia and passed away at his desk. people watching closely remember mitt romney and jim messina tweeting condolences and the obama campaign shut down for the day when alex died. what was meaningful was it's unfathomable. he was of the age that swept obama into power. not politically silent, but somewhat motionless and actually came out in full force and helped create this identity and they were as much a part of it that they supported and it just seems profoundly unfair that he didn't make it to see at least the end of the 2012 election cycle. >> talk about the process of how newtown changed the complexion's content of the list. >> we added essentially a second cover to this issue. we use that to acknowledge the victims of newtown. to point out that this is a celebration of life. there is no way to express the horror and the that occurred in that tragedy. our decision to acknowledge newtown in a context that we gave it was simply the only meaning we can scribe to at this moment. we have meaning for decades and decades
depot's annual revenue comes for the quarter that ends in july, about the same for lowe's as well. those are two stocks to watch in today's decision. but the nrf guy also made a point of saying that containers are coming in, and there could be a backup that needs to be resolved. even if the situation is resolved in a matter of days, there are still going to be containers that are stacked and they've got to work through that backlog before they can take in new containers. so there will be a ripple effect. >>> let's bring in peter anderson, senior portfolio manager with congress manage asset. good to see you. >> thank you. >> at this point, what is the risk to the markets? risk to the upside or the downside if a deal is reached? >> well, i first have to tell you that strategically, i'm not really factoring that the whole fiscal cliff picture into a longer term portfolio strategy. i think it's very, very difficult to do that however, like everybody else, we are glued to the headlines to see how this thing is going to play out. butting that being said, i think the main important reason is th
be brought up, it would pass overwhelmingly, i repeat. any given day the past six months, since july 25th, speaker boehner could have the middle class tax cut legislation to vote in the house and it would pass. but he is doing -- made the decision he is not going to let a vote on that because if he let it be voted upon it would pass. i have said here, mr. president, it is not too late for the speaker to take up the senate-passed bill but that time is even winding down. today is thursday. he is going to give 48 hours' notice to the house before they come back. so, 48 hours from today is saturday. with just that one vote, middle class families would have the secure that their taxes wouldn't go up by at least $2200 on new year's day. that's the average. some would go up more, some less, of course. speaker boehner should call members to of the house back to washington today. he shouldn't have let them go, in fact. they're not here. they're not here. john boehner seems to care more about keeping his speakership than keeping the nation on firm financial footing it is obvious, mr. president, wha
. >> julie watches c-span on verizon. treated by america's cable companies in 1979. brought to you as a public service by your publ television provider. >> a cornell university law professor has written a book examining corporations and the focus on increasing their stock prices. she spoke at the clinton school of public service in arkansas. she describes the corporate world were the efforts to maximize short-term profit has degraded the long-term value of many companies. this is 40 minutes. [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, france, -- friends, -- her work focuses on the intersection of law, business, and morality. she has been a speaker and panelist for events and organizations around the world, including the clinton global initiative. in 2012, she was named a top observer of the economy by the agenda at product. her newest book is the "shareholder value meth -- how putting shareholders' first harms' investors, corporations, and the public." that as a tablet find irresistible. please welcome -- a title i find irresistible. please welcome the professor. [applause] >> thank you, f
of july break. my staff said i am crazy. it was feasible if you went about the work seriously. by the fourth of the library, guess what? all of the bills had been passed. we were able to send everyone of those bills to the president's desk. they were signed in the law with bipartisan support. that sort of work can make a difference. more voices need to be heard in support of that effort. >> my recollection would be since then, it has been budgeting by continuing resolutions. >> we have done an awful lot. a lot of people do not realize we have demonstrated we can do this regular order. the more we move the committee back rather than having everything dominated in a speaker's office, the better off the congress will be. >> who loses and who gains when -- >> who loses and who gains when -- >> the existing agencies have their pipelines already clogged with money and we throw more money at it without any serious oversight. continuing resolutions are ignoring our responsibility and our goal is that we have got a job to do. to see how money is cspent, and to control how it should be
Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)